Ashland, MA:

This Single-Family in Ashland, MA recently sold for $234,509.
This is a Ranch/Bungalow style home and features 4 total rooms, 1 full bath, 1 bedroom, 1.72 acres, and was sold by
John Ellsworth – REALTY EXECUTIVES Boston West

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800px-Bougainvillea_FlowerPresenting spectacular masses of brilliantly colored bracts, bougainvillea is an outstanding addition to most any home landscape. The ornamental plant is celebrated worldwide for its utility and beauty, adorning gardens in the subtropics and tropics. A hardy shrub tolerant of most any soil or climatic condition, bougainvillea is a useful background planting for along fencelines or walls.

If you live in United States Plant Hardiness Zones 7 through 11, you will find a diverse array of bougainvillea varieties that will flourish in your locale. A common ornamental plant, bougainvillea is cultivated worldwide. You can let bougainvillea grow rampant and uncontrolled in a wild display of color, or trim and prune as a small tree or shrub. When bougainvillea is allowed to grow as it may, it will climb a tree or creep over a fence or rocky surface as a creeper or climber. Bougainvillea is easy to control, and it is no problem to direct growth over unsightly areas in the garden that you would prefer to hide such as a utility shed or rocky or barren patch of soil on a hillside. Bougainvillea plants are available for purchase online or from local home and garden supply stores and nurseries. Plants are available in shades of red, plum, pink, orange, burgundy, and purple.

Native to South America, bougainvillea was first discovered and introduced to Europe in 1880 by French botanist Commerson, who located the plant in Brazil. Commerson named the plant after Louis Antonine de Bougainvillea, a famous French navigator that Commerson accompanied on a voyage around the world with during 1766 through l769. Most garden bougainvillea cultivars have been derived from mutations and hybrids brought to Europe and North America from Central and South America.

Bougainvillea Cultivation

What’s not to love? Bougainvillea is disease free, easy to grow and propagate, presents a magnificent display of color for up to nine months out of the year, and can grow in poor soil subject to drought conditions. Bougainvillea can be pruned and trimmed into any shape or size, making it an ideal windbreak or patio screen as well as a cheerful foundation plant.

A fast growing shrub, bougainvillea varies in height and width dependent on the variety of species and cultivars. While there are single and multi-bracted bougainvilleas, garden experts prefer the single petal variety over the double for two main reasons. Single petled plants tend to be more prolific and dry, and dead flowers fall off the plant immediately. Doble petled plants retain the dead or dying flowers, presenting a less than a tidy appearance in the garden.

Although bougainvillea will survive in less than ideal growing conditions, it does best in a sunny location with nutrient-rich soil and good drainage. Bougainvillea does not like to have “wet feet” and has a tendency to decline if planted in an area subject to standing water. Like most other ornamental shrubs, bougainvillea will benefit from a twice yearly application of well-aged herbivore manure (sheep, goat, horse, cow). Work manure well into the top soil and water well. When a mass planting of one color of bougainvillea is established, it forms a perfect backdrop for special planting of smaller plants with flowers of a contrasting color. Try white day lilies showcased by a planting of scarlet bougainvillea or combine sunny yellow annuals such as marigold around the base of your bougainvillea shrubs.

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